Versioning is Just Too Complex

I’m currently trying to unlearn 10 years of CVCS and Subversion certainties to learn DVCS and Git. And although a lot of people see those as a huge leap forward, I can’t help thinking it’s still way too hard. Versioning is such a basic need, it shouldn’t require that much knowledge. Right now, whether it’s Subversion or Git (or Mercurial, or whatever), the problem is always the same for me: it’s just too low-level. Those systems are designed as if I needed to be a mechanic to drive my car. I don’t care about injectors, gearbox and all that stuff. All I want is to go faster or slower, turn left or right, and that’s about it. Now sure if I’m a mechanic, I can make my car perform much better, but if I just need to get from point A to point B, do you really think I will learn mechanics? Most people won’t. They will just walk there, or ride a bike. And that’s exactly what’s happening in too many companies: “manual versioning”, version numbers in file names, shared drives, even $harepoints, are just poor solutions to a real problem. We need versioning, but existing solutions have an unacceptable learning curve. They’re not smart enough, and they require us to be smart, even though that’s not our main purpose.

Even as a developer, sure I can understand such concepts, but I don’t want to learn what merge, pull, push, commit, branch or update mean. I want to start new projects, participate in existing projects, fix bugs, implement features, refactor my code. Whatever underlying system my company or team is using, whatever technologies I’m working with, my own workflow should not be influenced so much by the tools I use to keep track of my work and collaborate with my team. It should be transparent.

My point is: Git is a leap forward, but it’s a small one, and we need a giant one. We need a versioning system that implements workflows at a higher level, that abstracts away all those silly commands with similar names but different meanings. We need an abstraction layer that can work on top of existing lower-level tools like git, subversion and others, and that can be integrated seamlessly in development environments like IntelliJ Idea or Eclipse (sigh). Sure we will probably lose some power in the process, but we can leave it as an option.

In fact, we need to do with versioning what Maven has done to build lifecycle. Convention over configuration. What are the most common tasks we do on a daily basis:

  • start a new project
  • enter an existing project
  • start fixing a bug
  • start implementing a new feature
  • start refactoring some code
  • switch to another bugfix/feature/refactoring
  • complete a bugfix/feature/refactoring
  • share a bugfix/feature/refactoring with my team or with the world
  • what else?

And then let’s try to map those high-level tasks with lower-level command sequences. And let’s do it in such a way that I can easily change the underlying implementation, or reconfigure certain aspects of it. And why not add the possibility to define your own workflows for other things than traditional dev. In fact, to make things clearer, let’s just call git, subversion and other existing tools “versioning tools”, and let’s design a “collaboration framework”. Exactly like Maven is not a “build tool”, it’s a “build lifecycle framework”.

I’m just ranting out loud here, but what do you think?